County Leaders

November 19-21, 2019

The Davenport Grand Hotel
333 W. Spokane Falls Blvd.
Spokane, WA 99201

About

Join us for the 2019 County Leaders Conference in Spokane County this coming November 19-21. This three-day event brings together key decision-makers from across the state and provides the opportunity to connect, discover, and collaborate with peers. Attendees include representatives from all of Washington’s 39 counties and the following organizations:

  • Administrators
  • Commissioners / Councilmembers
  • Engineers
  • Human Services
  • Planning Directors
  • Public Health Officials
  • Solid Waste Managers
  • WSU Extension Directors

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Schedule

We are hard at work on the conference agenda and encourage you to check back often for more details.

Speakers

Wednesday, November 20

General Session
Pat Yourself on the Back. You’ve Earned It.

Not all levels of Government are broken. Some work extraordinarily well, on very limited budgets, thanks to many selfless and dedicated public servants.

Learning Outcomes:

  • What members of the Washington State Legislature can learn from local government officials
  • Why local government works.
  • The exceptional job done by county level officials, and why we should all be celebrating the job you do.
Jay Townsend

Keynote Speaker

The Townsend Group

Speechwriter, debate coach, marketing and advertising strategist, Jay Townsend has worked in four U.S. Presidential campaigns, scores of U.S. Senate, Gubernatorial and Congressional races,and a myriad of County Executive, Mayoral, legislative and judicial contests. He is the author of So You Want to Run for Public Office, The Worst Mistakes Candidates Make and Timeless Lessons from the 2016 Election. Townsend has received several national awards for his work,including the nation’s best television commercial aired in a Gubernatorial race,the best persuasion mail piece produced for a Presidential campaign,and the nation’s best newspaper ad for a political candidate. A member of the National Speakers Association and World Speakers Federation, Townsend has spoken before hundreds of audiences, including the United States Military Academy, the Marketing Research Association, and the Marist Institute for Public Opinion. He has appeared on NBC, NY1,New York’s Capitol Tonight, Canadian TV, and FOX News. He serves as a global advisor to the Luce Foundation in New York. Raised on afarm inIndiana, he earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Agriculture Economics and Farm Management from Purdue University.He resides with his wife Rebecca in New York City.

Session
We’re here to help! State Auditor’s Office Tools and technologies

The State Auditor’s Office Center for Government Innovation provides resources and data tools that address current and emerging audit issues by counties statewide. Hear about how the public-facing Financial Intelligence

Tool (FIT) displays data to assist governments in their financial decision making.

Learning Outcomes:

  • See how FIT provides a user-friendly way to understand and evaluate financial information as well as compare your government to peer governments

  • Learn how FIT can help you analyze financial trends and evaluate your county’s financial situation with the same financial indicators used by auditors

  • Explore ways to communicate your county’s story to the public

Duane Walz

Data and Business Systems Specialist

Office of the Washington State Auditor

Duane Walz joined the Office of the State Auditor in 1994. He has played a key role in collecting, maintaining and publishing government financial data over the years. He is currently the Data and Systems Specialist for the Center for Government Innovation where he is tasked with creating new ways to display data. He is the technical lead on the Financial Intelligence Tool (FIT). Duane received a Lean Six Sigma Green Belt in 2013.

Session
We’re here to help! State Auditor’s Office Tools and technologies

The State Auditor’s Office Center for Government Innovation provides resources and data tools that address current and emerging audit issues by counties statewide. Hear about how the public-facing Financial Intelligence

Tool (FIT) displays data to assist governments in their financial decision making.

Learning Outcomes:

  • See how FIT provides a user-friendly way to understand and evaluate financial information as well as compare your government to peer governments

  • Learn how FIT can help you analyze financial trends and evaluate your county’s financial situation with the same financial indicators used by auditors

  • Explore ways to communicate your county’s story to the public

Niles Kostick

Financial Management and Data Tools Specialist

Office of the Washington State Auditor

Niles has been with the Office of the Washington State Auditor since the start of 2014. Since then, he’s performed hundreds of audits and managed the performance of an inventory of more than 600 government clients. He presents to a wide range of local governments on topics of accounting, reporting, and internal controls, and currently holds the position of Financial Management and Data Tools Specialist for the Center for Government Innovation.

Session
Taking it to the Streets. A Collaborative Outreach Program

Taking it to the Streets. A Collaborative Outreach Program. Learn how a small rural county is addressing the opioid crisis, homelessness, and behavioral health challenges in the community. Island County Human Services Outreach Behavioral Health/Opioid Outreach/Homeless Housing divisions, Island County Law Enforcement, Island County Public Health Nurses, along with Amerigroup and the University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute collaborate to engage the most vulnerable, high utilizer/high risk populations.

The program provides real opportunities for change including permanent housing solutions, behavioral health treatment, and successful jail transition through embedding behavioral health with law enforcement, outreach, and intensive case management.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Collaboration between County Government Departments

  • Funding opportunities and ideas for small Counties

  • Creative program development to address current issues

Jackie Henderson

Director

Island County Human Services

Jackie is the Director of Island County Human Services. She oversees multiple programs and services provided either directly or indirectly by the department. She participates in a number of regional behavioral health committees and work groups and is an active member of the Association of County Human Services. Jackie lives in Coupeville Washington where she is a member of the Coupeville Town Council.

Session
Taking it to the Streets. A Collaborative Outreach Program

Taking it to the Streets. A Collaborative Outreach Program. Learn how a small rural county is addressing the opioid crisis, homelessness, and behavioral health challenges in the community. Island County Human Services Outreach Behavioral Health/Opioid Outreach/Homeless Housing divisions, Island County Law Enforcement, Island County Public Health Nurses, along with Amerigroup and the University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute collaborate to engage the most vulnerable, high utilizer/high risk populations.

The program provides real opportunities for change including permanent housing solutions, behavioral health treatment, and successful jail transition through embedding behavioral health with law enforcement, outreach, and intensive case management.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Collaboration between County Government Departments

  • Funding opportunities and ideas for small Counties

  • Creative program development to address current issues

Betsy Griffith

Behavioral Health Lead

Island County Human Services

Betsy Griffith, LMHC, NCC is a therapist and counseling supervisor specializing in adolescents and families. Her primary focus is building holistic interpersonal skills through a combination of CBT and yoga and mindfulness. She graduated with a M.A. in Counseling from Marquette University in 2005. She has worked as a school counselor; a therapist in a residential treatment center for adjudicated adolescent males; a school based therapist and as a clinical supervisor to school based behavioral health and Opioid Outreach.

 

Session
Taking it to the Streets. A Collaborative Outreach Program

Taking it to the Streets. A Collaborative Outreach Program. Learn how a small rural county is addressing the opioid crisis, homelessness, and behavioral health challenges in the community. Island County Human Services Outreach Behavioral Health/Opioid Outreach/Homeless Housing divisions, Island County Law Enforcement, Island County Public Health Nurses, along with Amerigroup and the University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute collaborate to engage the most vulnerable, high utilizer/high risk populations.

The program provides real opportunities for change including permanent housing solutions, behavioral health treatment, and successful jail transition through embedding behavioral health with law enforcement, outreach, and intensive case management.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Collaboration between County Government Departments

  • Funding opportunities and ideas for small Counties

  • Creative program development to address current issues

Kathryn Clancy

Behavioral Health Clinical Supervisor

Island County Human Services

Kathryn Clancy is a licensed mental health counselor and former psychology professor with over 25 years of experience in counseling and teaching. She currently supervisors Behavioral Health Pro-grams in Island County including outreach counseling and case management, jail mental health and transitions, embedded mental health with law enforcement, intensive case management with homeless, early childhood mental health and adolescent at risk intervention programs. Her exper-tise is in program development, the treatment of adolescents and young adults, suicide assessment and prevention, serious mental illness and substance use disorders.

Session
Taking it to the Streets. A Collaborative Outreach Program

Taking it to the Streets. A Collaborative Outreach Program. Learn how a small rural county is addressing the opioid crisis, homelessness, and behavioral health challenges in the community. Island County Human Services Outreach Behavioral Health/Opioid Outreach/Homeless Housing divisions, Island County Law Enforcement, Island County Public Health Nurses, along with Amerigroup and the University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute collaborate to engage the most vulnerable, high utilizer/high risk populations.

The program provides real opportunities for change including permanent housing solutions, behavioral health treatment, and successful jail transition through embedding behavioral health with law enforcement, outreach, and intensive case management.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Collaboration between County Government Departments

  • Funding opportunities and ideas for small Counties

  • Creative program development to address current issues

Joanne Pelant


Housing Program Supervisor

Island County Human Services

Joanne is the Housing Resource Coordinator for Island County Human Services. She has been working on Homelessness and Affordable Housing issues for Island County since 2012. Her former career was as the Vice President with National Real Estate organization, specializing in converting luxury rental properties to coops and condo’s in major cities in the US. She moved to Whidbey Island in 2006 and is married with two grown sons.

Session
Out of Sight. Out of Mind: Why You Must Communicate with Your Constituents

Your constituents lead busy lives, and they don’t wake up wondering what you did yesterday. Why is it crucial to maintain a dialogue with citizens of your jurisdiction, be present in the community and assertive in sharing your successes.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Seven effective ways to communicate with your constituents

  • Why they work

  • How it’s done, including Facebook, local newspapers, press conferences, newsletters, email campaigns, televised meetings, and public forums

Jay Townsend

Keynote Speaker

The Townsend Group

Speechwriter, debate coach, marketing and advertising strategist, Jay Townsend has worked in four U.S. Presidential campaigns, scores of U.S. Senate, Gubernatorial and Congressional races,and a myriad of County Executive, Mayoral, legislative and judicial contests. He is the author of So You Want to Run for Public Office, The Worst Mistakes Candidates Make and Timeless Lessons from the 2016 Election. Townsend has received several national awards for his work,including the nation’s best television commercial aired in a Gubernatorial race,the best persuasion mail piece produced for a Presidential campaign,and the nation’s best newspaper ad for a political candidate. A member of the National Speakers Association and World Speakers Federation, Townsend has spoken before hundreds of audiences, including the United States Military Academy, the Marketing Research Association, and the Marist Institute for Public Opinion. He has appeared on NBC, NY1,New York’s Capitol Tonight, Canadian TV, and FOX News. He serves as a global advisor to the Luce Foundation in New York. Raised on afarm inIndiana, he earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Agriculture Economics and Farm Management from Purdue University.He resides with his wife Rebecca in New York City.

Session
Introduction to Olympia: How to Engage with the State Legislature

Attendees will learn the ins and outs of the state legislative process and how to effectively engage their state legislators, including how to prepare and present testimony, engage in active outreach and lobbying, and how to use the leg.wa.gov website to obtain valuable information about legislation. Attendees will hear real life examples from Olympia insiders: Mike Hoover spent 20 years inside the state legislature, with 10 years as Senate Counsel and then assuming a leadership counsel position with the House of Representatives before becoming a contract lobbyist. Mellani McAleenan, WSAC’s Director of Government Relations, has 20 years of experience working as a lobbyist and advocate before the state legislature. This interactive session is open to all who wish to attend, including members of WSAC’s Legislative Steering Committee, as well as anyone who wants to learn more about the state legislative process.

Learning Outcomes:

  • How to engage state legislators

  • How to navigate the legislature’s website

  • How to prepare and present testimony and “white papers”/ handouts

Mellani McAleenan

Director of Government Relations

WSAC

Ms. Mellani McAleenan joined WSAC as the Director of Government Relations and General Counsel in September 2018. Mellani has worked in government relations since 2000, most recently as Director of Government Affairs for the Washington State Dental Association. Mellani has also represented the state judicial branch of government as the primary legislative advocate for the Board for Judicial Administration, Administrative Office of the Courts, and Supreme Court. Prior to her work with the judicial branch, Mellani advocated on behalf of the business community, including six years as a Governmental Affairs Director for the Association of Washington Business. Mellani earned her Doctor of Jurisprudence degree from Seattle University and her BS in Human Services from Wayland Baptist University.

Session
Introduction to Olympia: How to Engage with the State Legislature

Attendees will learn the ins and outs of the state legislative process and how to effectively engage their state legislators, including how to prepare and present testimony, engage in active outreach and lobbying, and how to use the leg.wa.gov website to obtain valuable information about legislation. Attendees will hear real life examples from Olympia insiders: Mike Hoover spent 20 years inside the state legislature, with 10 years as Senate Counsel and then assuming a leadership counsel position with the House of Representatives before becoming a contract lobbyist. Mellani McAleenan, WSAC’s Director of Government Relations, has 20 years of experience working as a lobbyist and advocate before the state legislature. This interactive session is open to all who wish to attend, including members of WSAC’s Legislative Steering Committee, as well as anyone who wants to learn more about the state legislative process.

Learning Outcomes:

  • How to engage state legislators

  • How to navigate the legislature’s website

  • How to prepare and present testimony and “white papers”/ handouts

Mike Hoover

Contract Lobbyist

Mike Hoover Public Affirs

Mike Hoover is an attorney with over 25 years of experience working in state and local governmental affairs. Mike began his career in 1988 working for the California State Assembly and Governor’s office before moving to private practice in Seattle. Mike enjoyed a 20-year legal career in the Washington Legislature, beginning as a staff attorney, serving as Senate Counsel for ten years, and then assuming a Leadership Counsel position in the House of Representatives for six years. Mike next served as Chief Legal Counsel to the King County Council before starting his own public affairs practice in 2018. This experience has provided him with unique expertise and hands-on work in legislative and budget processes.

Working in both state and local government, Mike has been active in almost every policy issue area, including capital and operating budgets, transportation, labor, business, environment, healthcare, education, public infrastructure, finance, and revenue. He has been an integral part of legislation and negotiations for major projects including the McCleary education reforms, Safeco Field financing, complex transportation budgets, and many state operating and capital biennial and supplemental budgets. Mike has secured funding from the state’s various budgets for his clients, and he has successfully shepherded numerous bills through the legislative process and into law.

Mike has the skills, contacts, and experience to support clients in Olympia and throughout Washington. He has worked hard to cultivate excellent bipartisan working relationships with legislators from around the state, in both the House and the Senate, and he also has significant Governor, executive, and agency contacts. He is known as a consensus builder who puts together teams and coalitions to get results.

Mike closely coordinates with his clients to keep them apprised of relevant issues and help them strategize and act to affect those issues. He understands that while the legislative process is the same, each client is different, and each budget and legislative request requires a unique strategy and coalition of legislators. Mike has the ability to partner with other professionals as necessary to ensure the resources and support necessary are always available, and he is adept at matching the right strategy with the right coalition to achieve successful outcomes for his clients. With extensive background in legislative, budgetary, and legal matters, Mike Hoover Public Affairs can provide unparalleled representation.

Session
Washington Road Usage Charge Pilot: Test Drive the Road Ahead

Washington is exploring a potential gas tax replacement to fund our roads and bridges. Conducted by the Washington State Transportation Commission (WSTC), the test-driving phase of the Washington Road Usage Charge (WA RUC) Pilot Project ended in January 2019. Approximately 2,000 drivers participated in the year-long WA RUC Pilot Project, reported their mileage, and provided feedback to help state decision-makers understand if this potential policy could work for Washington drivers.

Now that the test-driving phase of the pilot is complete, the information collected during the pilot is being compiled and analyzed, and a comprehensive report of findings and recommendations will be submitted to the Governor, the State Legislature, and United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) in early 2020.

This session will offer an inside look into the study’s findings and recommendations.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand what a road usage charge is

  • Understand what the findings and recommendations of the pilot project are

  • Understand what to expect in the 2020 legislative session

Jeff Doyle

Partner

D’Artagnan Consulting

Jeff Doyle has 23 years’ experience advising legislative and executive branch officials on transportation law and policy development, with specific expertise in taxation, innovative finance, road usage charges, and sustainable transportation programs. He has created, led or provided key support to recent initiatives at the state, multi-state and federal level. Before joining D’Artagnan, Mr. Doyle served as Director of Public/Private Partnerships for the Washington State Department of Transportation, where he focused on innovative financing, alternative funding, and new methods for engaging the private sector in important transportation projects and policies.

Session
Noteworthy Legal Updates

This presentation will cover new and interesting changes to Washington and Federal case law that affects county government.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understanding of the current state of important legal issues;

  • Understanding the impact that a legal decision in one county can have on the entire state

  • A better understanding of the State and Federal Court systems

Christopher Anderson

Deputy Prosecuting Attorney

Spokane County

Chris Anderson is a Deputy Prosecuting Attorney in the Civil Division of the Spokane County Prosecutor’s Office. Prior to moving to the Civil Division, Chris practiced as a criminal
prosecutor in both Spokane and Island County, prosecuting a wide variety of misdemeanor and felony cases. Chris currently provides advice to clients at all levels of County government and has experience working in Land Use, Code Enforcement, Involuntary Treatment Act, Risk
Management, Public Records, Taxation, and Legislative Process. Chris received his law degree from Gonzaga University and undergraduate degrees from Seattle University.

Session
Roles and Responsibilities of Local Boards of Health

Public health is an essential service guaranteed to all residents by Washington state law. From drinking water safety and restaurant inspections, to tobacco use prevention and disease prevention and control, the work of public health is to help communities to be safe and healthy. As a local board of health member, you are responsible for the protection of our community’s health. But what does this entail? This session will provide a introduction to the roles and responsibilities of local board of health have in making our counties healthy, safe and thriving communities. It is best suited for county officials who serve on and interact with their local boards of health.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand the role local boards of health play in the public health system.

  • Identify specific responsibilities local boards of health have under state law.

  • Describe how local boards of health work with state and local agencies on public health issues.

Jaime Bodden

Managing Director

WSALPHO

Jaime Bodden is the Managing Director for WSALPHO. Previously, Jaime managed and oversaw the operations of a small health department as Health Officer/Director. Additionally, Jaime has experience in community engagement, health promotion, global health, and health policy. She holds Master degrees in Social Work and Public Health from Washington University in St. Louis.

Session
A Road Map to Washington’s Future Report: Key Findings and Pathways to Implementation

On June 30, 2019, the William D. Ruckelshaus Center issued its Final Report on the Road Map to Washington’s Future, a project assigned by the Legislature. For two years, the Center conducted a collaborative process with many people and organizations to articulate a desired future for Washington and to identify revisions, clarifications, or additions to state laws, institutions, and policies needed to reach that future.

The scope included not just the GMA, SMA, and SEPA, but laws regarding annexation, forest practices, revenue authorities and fiscal tools, and the roles and responsibilities of state agencies, regional, county, city, and special district governments. County officials input to the Road Map process included letters, interviews, and participation at three WSAC workshops and 26 regional workshops across the state. This session provides an overview of the Final Report, including the collaborative processes used, what was heard and learned by the Ruckelshaus Center team, and a summary of guidance in the form of potential transformational changes, and key reforms. This is an opportunity to learn about the findings, changes, and reforms described in the Final Report and to discuss what future actions WSAC and its members should consider in 2020 and beyond.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Learn about the findings, transformational changes and key reforms outlined in the Ruckelshaus Center’s June 30 Final Report to the Legislature.

  • Learn which transformational changes or key reforms align with county needs and interests, and discuss which represent priorities for county participation and/or advocacy going forward.

  • Learn about opportunities for WSAC or individual county officials to participate in future collaborations, draft potential legislation, share success stories, or identify topics for future research by the state’s universities.

Amanda Murphy

Senior Project Lead; Assistant Professor, WSU Extension

The William D. Ruckelshaus Center; Washington State University

Amanda is a Senior Project Lead at William D. Ruckelshaus Center and Washington State University Extension Faculty. At the Ruckelshaus Center, Amanda designs and leads multi-party collaborative processes that help people work together to develop and implement shared solutions to challenging public policy issues. She designed and leads the Center’s Collaboration Governance Training Program and provides trainings on systems thinking, conducting assessments and interviews, collaborative problem-solving, conflict resolution and facilitation. Amanda also designed and co-leads the Center’s Collaborative Leaders Internship Program.

Session
A Road Map to Washington’s Future Report: Key Findings and Pathways to Implementation

On June 30, 2019, the William D. Ruckelshaus Center issued its Final Report on the Road Map to Washington’s Future, a project assigned by the Legislature. For two years, the Center conducted a collaborative process with many people and organizations to articulate a desired future for Washington and to identify revisions, clarifications, or additions to state laws, institutions, and policies needed to reach that future.

The scope included not just the GMA, SMA, and SEPA, but laws regarding annexation, forest practices, revenue authorities and fiscal tools, and the roles and responsibilities of state agencies, regional, county, city, and special district governments. County officials input to the Road Map process included letters, interviews, and participation at three WSAC workshops and 26 regional workshops across the state. This session provides an overview of the Final Report, including the collaborative processes used, what was heard and learned by the Ruckelshaus Center team, and a summary of guidance in the form of potential transformational changes, and key reforms. This is an opportunity to learn about the findings, changes, and reforms described in the Final Report and to discuss what future actions WSAC and its members should consider in 2020 and beyond.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Learn about the findings, transformational changes and key reforms outlined in the Ruckelshaus Center’s June 30 Final Report to the Legislature.

  • Learn which transformational changes or key reforms align with county needs and interests, and discuss which represent priorities for county participation and/or advocacy going forward.

  • Learn about opportunities for WSAC or individual county officials to participate in future collaborations, draft potential legislation, share success stories, or identify topics for future research by the state’s universities.

Joseph Tovar

Affiliate Associate Professor

University of Washington College of Built Environments

Joe Tovar served eighteen years as planning director for three Washington cities, twelve years on the state growth management board, and seven years as a consultant advising state agencies, counties, cities, and private clients. He is affiliate faculty at the UW in the College of Built Environments and adjunct faculty at WSU. The Ruckelshaus Center tapped his subject matter expertise to co-lead the Road Map to Washington’s Future, a project commissioned by the Legislature to articulate a desired future for our state and to identify revisions, additions or clarifications to state laws, institutions, and policies needed to reach that future.

Session
Think Social Media Isn’t A Public Record - Think Again

Social media offers agencies great ways to engage and communicate with the community. It’s timely, encourages engagement, and helps build trust. Agencies must still comply with the Public Records Act: the godfather of Open Government. This presentation will help county officials achieve and remain compliant with the Act when using social media by providing insights on the origins of the Act, the law related to the use of personal accounts and devices and Washington Court decisions enforcing the Act.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Learn how to identify possible public records wherever they may be located including social media platforms.

  • Understand agency and personal obligations to locate responsive records.

  • Build an understanding of the Act’s expectation in providing public records and the repercussions (penalties) for not meeting these expectations.

Morgan Damerow

Local Government Public Records Consultant

Office of the Attorney General, Washington State

Morgan Damerow serves as the Local Government Public Records Act Consultant with the Washington State Attorney General’s Office (AGO). In this position, Morgan provides guidance to local government officials on responding to public records requests, seeking resources to develop or update technology related to public records and ensuring agencies comply with requests properly and efficiently. Morgan frequently provides training to local governments and speaks to conference participants on the Public Records Act. He started with the AGO in 2003 and has been lead counsel for numerous state agencies. He graduated from the University of Montana, School of Law in 1997, and received his BA from Linfield College in 1990.

The 4th Stage

Wednesday, November 20

New this year! Introducing the Fourth Stage. We know that everyone learns a little differently, and sometimes you are just not up for listening in on an hour-long presentation. The Fourth Stage offers quick learning opportunities limited to no more than 30-minutes and topics that vary. The Fourth Stage will be located near our traditional breakout rooms – take a moment to check them out.

Session
Voluntary Stewardship Program: What Commissioners Need to Know

This session is open to all, but directed specifically at county commissioners.

Attendees will learn about Washington State’s Voluntary Stewardship Program (VSP), which serves to protect critical areas through the use of voluntary, incentive-based programs while seeking to maintain agricultural viability within 27 participating counties.

VSP is an alternative to regulation under Washington State’s Growth Management Act (GMA). The GMA requires counties complete comprehensive plans and set development regulations to guide future growth, but has not been applied to agriculture. Recent court cases resolved to apply GMA to agriculture, and the VSP is an alternative solution created to protect critical areas while maintaining agricultural viability without resorting to regulation. This session will cover – Why VSP was developed and why is it important to your county The relationship between VSP and the Growth Management Act County requirements for participating in VSP Implementing a VSP work plan through the county work group Monitoring, evaluation, and consequences Reporting requirements and rolesCurrent VSP implementation efforts.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand the Voluntary Stewardship Program and how it applies in their county

  • Understand the current state of Voluntary Stewardship Program implementation

  • Be able to explain the significance of the Voluntary Stewardship Program to their constituents

Bill Eller

VSP Coordinator

Washington State Conservation Commission

Bill Eller is a Washington State Conservation Commission staff member and serves as the Voluntary Stewardship Program Coordinator and Elections Officer for the Commission. He has been with the Conservation Commission for over 10 years.
Bill previously practiced both criminal and civil law while at the Yakima County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for nine years, and was an adjunct professor at Central Washington University for ten years teaching undergraduate classes in the law.

Session
The Elson S. Floyd Medical School: Focus on Rural Washington

The Elson S. Floyd Medical School accepted its third cohort of medical students with over 1500 applications and 80 accepted. The class hails from 20 counties across the state, 12 of which are rural, and 100 percent are from or have significant ties to Washington. The goal of the medical school is to recruit medical students from rural communities, train them in rural communities and place them in the locations they are needed most. The Elson S. Floyd Medical School incorporates medicine, nursing, pharmacy and exercise physiology to train students to meet the current and future needs of our state. We have built numerous partnerships with hospitals, clinics, and health departments to expand our reach throughout the state.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Elson S. Floyd Medical School is the newest medical school in the state.

  • Understand that an emphasis is placed on recruiting students from rural communities.

  • Understand that the an emphasis is to train and place students in rural communities.

Ken Roberts

Vice Dean, Academic and Community Partnerships

WSU Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine

Dr. Ken Roberts is the Vice Dean for Academic and Community Partnerships in Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine. As Vice Dean, he is responsible for the overall administration of the educational program at the four campuses where medical students will be trained. He works to develop and maintain partnerships with community clinics and hospitals, and facilitates academic partnerships between the campuses and the medical community, businesses, and stakeholders invested in increasing medical care access throughout the state. His office leads outreach efforts to reach students in rural and underserved communities to promote careers in medicine.

Session
Grants for Historic County Courthouses

Planning a capital improvement to your historic courthouse? The Historic County Courthouse Rehabilitation Grant Program was established during the 2005-07 biennium with the goal of supporting counties in their efforts to preserve and rehabilitate our state’s historic courthouses. Since inception, the program has awarded over $18M in state matching grants to 26 counties, leveraging over $48M in overall capital investments to these highly significant public buildings. The next application cycle for grant funding will be held in the summer of 2020 for funds available in the 2021-23 biennium. This session will cover the eligibility criteria and application process, provide examples of past successful projects, and debunk concerns over the perceived restrictions historic designation places on public buildings. The County Courthouse Grant Program is a program of the Washington State Department of Archaeology & Historic Preservation. The Washington Trust for Historic Preservation administers the program under contract with the agency.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Introduce attendees to the County Courthouse Grant Program

  • Understand program criteria and application process

  • Demonstrate examples of successful applications

Chris Moore

Executive Director

Washington Trust for Historic Preservation

Chris Moore is the Executive Director for the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation. Established in 1976, the WA Trust is a nonprofit, membership organization dedicated to safeguarding Washington’s historic places through advocacy, education, stewardship and collaboration. As Executive Director, Chris oversees day-to-day management and operation of the organization and spearheads advocacy efforts, working across the state with local communities engaged in efforts to preserve those historic and cultural resources that enrich our environment and add to Washington’s unique sense of place.
Chris holds an MA in Preservation Studies from Boston University.

Session
Maritime Washington National Heritage Area: An Adventure in Heritage Tourism!

Did you know that Washington’s saltwater coastline was recently designated as the Maritime Washington National Heritage Area? A National Heritage Area is designated by Congress for its unique nationally significant qualities and resources. It is a place where a combination of natural, cultural, historic and recreational resources have shaped a cohesive, nationally distinctive landscape. The new Maritime WA NHA encompasses over 3,000 miles of Washington State coastline, including Seattle’s ship canal and Lake Union. It will focus on themes such as Canoe Cultures, Voyages of Discovery, Trade & Commerce, and several others. The Washington Trust for Historic Preservation has been named as the management entity for the NHA. Strategies for managing the area will employ a partnership approach to heritage development involving collaborative planning with residents, government agencies, nonprofit groups and private partners. Thirteen of Washington’s thirty-nine counties have coastline included in the Maritime WA NHA. This session will introduce participants to this newly designated NHA and the tourism and economic development opportunities it creates.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Familiarize attendees with the National Heritage Area Program

  • Introduce attendees to the newly designated Maritime WA NHA

  • Learn about opportunities to get involved with the planning process for management of the new NHA

Chris Moore

Executive Director

Washington Trust for Historic Preservation

Chris Moore is the Executive Director for the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation. Established in 1976, the WA Trust is a nonprofit, membership organization dedicated to safeguarding Washington’s historic places through advocacy, education, stewardship and collaboration. As Executive Director, Chris oversees day-to-day management and operation of the organization and spearheads advocacy efforts, working across the state with local communities engaged in efforts to preserve those historic and cultural resources that enrich our environment and add to Washington’s unique sense of place.
Chris holds an MA in Preservation Studies from Boston University.

Thursday, November 20

Deep Dive
The Top Ten Ways Jail Personnel Get in Trouble

Based on his experiences as a practitioner and a lawyer, Gordon Graham has identified ten things – job based harassment, ethics and integrity, complacency, fatigue, report writing, mental health, physical fitness, failure to follow policy and procedure, cognitive bias, and record keeping – and identify proven control measures to prevent these things from occurring.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand what the specific tasks are in jail operations that are overrepresented in tragedies.

  • Learn what control measures need to be put into place to prevent these problems from occurring.

  • Leave the program with an expanded level of knowledge regarding real risk management and how it applies to your jail operations in your county.

Gordon Graham

Owner

Graham Research
Consultants

Gordon Graham is a retired 33 year veteran of California Law Enforcement. During his tenure as a police professional, he was awarded his Teaching Credential from California State University, Long Beach. He was later graduated from University of Southern California with a Master’s Degree in Safety and Systems Management. Subsequent to this he was graduated from Western State University with a Juris Doctorate. His education as a Risk Manager and experience as a practicing Attorney, coupled with his extensive background in law enforcement, have allowed him to rapidly become recognized as a leading professional speaker with multiple areas of expertise.
Mr. Graham has taken this background as a street cop, supervisor and manager and coupled it with his formal education as a risk manager and his education and experiences as an attorney and is the Co-Founder of Lexipol – a company designed to standardize policies, procedures and training within fire departments and law enforcement agencies around America.

Over the last decade, Mr. Graham has made over 3,000 presentations to various groups including law enforcement, corrections personnel, fraud investigators, fire professionals, EMS, other first responders, legal professionals, educators, city, county and district employees, law firms, hospitals and real estate companies along with many other high-risk private sector organizations.

Session
The Opioid Crisis: County Efforts to Stem the Tide

Opioid use disorder continues to negatively impact counties across the state. As additional state and federal resources flow to local efforts to stop the opioid crisis, Washington State counties continue to try different treatment and prevention methods to decrease opioid use. Three counties—Pierce, Thurston and Snohomish—will talk about their latest efforts to combat the opioid crisis using different county-level approaches, including a comprehensive cross-sector task force and annual opioid summits. Each county representative will present best practices, successes to date and lessons learned. This session will present both an urban and rural perspective to addressing the opioid epidemic. This session is open to all.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand three different approaches to addressing the opioid epidemic at the county level.

  • Learn how to bring and keep key partners in opioid collaboratives.

  • Understand the successes and pitfalls of opioid collaboratives.

Derek Young

Pierce County Council member

Pierce County Council

Derek Young is a member of the Pierce County Council, representing District #7 which covers the Gig Harbor and Key Peninsulas, Islands, and parts of North and West Tacoma. Derek currently chairs the Community Development Committee which directs land use, environment, and park policy. He co-chairs the Pierce County Opioid Task Force and serves as vice-chair of the Public Safety, Human Services, & Budget Committee responsible for law enforcement, corrections, justice, public health, and human services. Derek serves on the National Association of Counties Health Policy Board, Washington Association of Counties Law and Legislative Steering Committees, and Washington Telecom Officials and Advisors Board.

Session
The Opioid Crisis: County Efforts to Stem the Tide

Opioid use disorder continues to negatively impact counties across the state. As additional state and federal resources flow to local efforts to stop the opioid crisis, Washington State counties continue to try different treatment and prevention methods to decrease opioid use. Three counties—Pierce, Thurston and Snohomish—will talk about their latest efforts to combat the opioid crisis using different county-level approaches, including a comprehensive cross-sector task force and annual opioid summits. Each county representative will present best practices, successes to date and lessons learned. This session will present both an urban and rural perspective to addressing the opioid epidemic. This session is open to all.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand three different approaches to addressing the opioid epidemic at the county level.

  • Learn how to bring and keep key partners in opioid collaboratives.

  • Understand the successes and pitfalls of opioid collaboratives.

Heather Thomas

Public & Government Affairs Manager

Snohomish Health District

Heather Thomas is the Public & Government Affairs Manager with the Snohomish Health District. She has been involved in a variety of local and statewide opioid efforts, launching the website SnohomishOverdosePrevention.com in August 2017 and helping to secure more than $1M in opioid funding since 2018. Heather is the current President for the Washington State Public Health Association and serves as Co-Chair for the Public Health Communications Workgroup for the National Association of County and City Health Officials.

Session
The Opioid Crisis: County Efforts to Stem the Tide

Opioid use disorder continues to negatively impact counties across the state. As additional state and federal resources flow to local efforts to stop the opioid crisis, Washington State counties continue to try different treatment and prevention methods to decrease opioid use. Three counties—Pierce, Thurston and Snohomish—will talk about their latest efforts to combat the opioid crisis using different county-level approaches, including a comprehensive cross-sector task force and annual opioid summits. Each county representative will present best practices, successes to date and lessons learned. This session will present both an urban and rural perspective to addressing the opioid epidemic. This session is open to all.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand three different approaches to addressing the opioid epidemic at the county level.

  • Learn how to bring and keep key partners in opioid collaboratives.

  • Understand the successes and pitfalls of opioid collaboratives.

Schelli Slaughter

Director

Thurston County Public Health and Social Services

Schelli is the Director of Thurston County Public Health and Social Services, Administrator of the Thurston County Board of Health, and Co-chair of Thurston County’s Opioid Task Force. Schelli has over 20 years of experience in leadership and direct service working to improve community health, hope, and wellbeing. She is an immediate past Board member and current Executive Leadership Committee member of the Washington State Association of Local Public Health Officials (WSALPHO), an affiliate of WSAC. She serves on the Boards of Directors of CHOICE Regional Health Network and the Cascade Pacific Action Alliance, a seven-county Accountable Community of Health. Schelli also serves on the Thurston County Pre-Trial Services Board, the Thurston County Law and Justice Council, and Thurston Thrives Coordinating Council. She has been personally affected by the opioid crisis through the loss of a dear family member and is passionate about working in partnership to develop and implement strategies to end this epidemic.

Session
Big or small, cybersecurity risks affect every government

No matter the sector or size of your government, the risks are similar. These could involve disruption to public services resulting from a cyber-attack or an employee being duped into transferring money or protected information to an imposter. This presentation will talk through some of these risks, the impacts, and protective measures to defend your government against cyber-attacks. Everyone in a local government has an important role to play in helping to minimize cybersecurity risks. All staff should be proactive in protecting information and systems. The State Auditor’s Office Center for Government Innovation would like to share resources that will help governments respond to ever-evolving cybersecurity threats to their systems and data.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand that everyone regardless of their position has a role in protecting against cyber attacks.

  • Learn about the risks, the impacts, and protective measures needed to defend your government against cyber-attacks.

  • Be aware of available resources that will help governments respond to everevolving cybersecurity threats to their systems and data.

Aaron Munn

Chief Information Security Officer

Office of the Washington State Auditor

Aaron Munn joined the Office of the Washington State Auditor (SAO) in September 2014 as the Chief Information Security Officer. He serves as SAO’s internal chief authority for IT security functions, policies and processes. In total, Aaron has over 17 years of service with the State of Washington and 12 years’ experience within the IT security field. Additionally, Aaron recently retired from the Washington Army National Guard with more than 26 years of service. His most recent assignment was cybersecurity operations.

Session
A Data Dive Into Washington’s Counties

NACo’s County Explorer tool provides easy access to hundreds of county and statelevel indicators. The information ranges across multiple categories; from county administration to policy issues, including transportation, housing, health, and public safety. Join us for an interactive session that will showcase the redesigned user interface and functionality – while exploring the application of the tool. Attendees will learn how to compare counties across multiple data points, access advocacy materials, and use the time-series functionality. Attendees will also learn how to leverage the power of county-level data to tell their unique county story and have the opportunity to ask questions.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Be able to use County Explorer to compare counties across multiple data points

  • Can easily access advocacy materials provided within County Explorer

  • Be able to use County Explorer’s time-series functionality

Ricardo Aguilar

Data Analyst & Developer

National Association of Counties

Ricardo Aguilar is a Data Analyst & Developer with NACo’s County Innovations Lab. He works primarily on data analyses, County Explorer development, as well as building maps, query engines, and other interactive data tools. Before his full-time position, Ricardo worked as a NACo research intern, a faculty assistant for the Global Land Analysis and Discovery Lab and a teaching assistant for the Department of Geographical Sciences at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Ricardo holds a Bachelor of Science in Geographical Studies and a Master of Professional Studies in Geospatial Information Sciences from the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland.

Session
The Virtuous Circle: Teaching a Community How to be a Community

Could “kindness” be a business model? Spokesman-Review editor Rob Curley will explain how Spokane’s oldest and largest news organization embraced the concept of “the virtuous circle” — showing how a community grows in innumerable ways when it works together for the positive. More importantly, this unique strategy illustrates how a company can show leadership during difficult times for its industry to prove that positivity can feed more than just a bottom line … it can re-energize its hometown.

Rob Curley

Editor

Spokesman-Review

Dating back to the early days of the Internet, Spokesman-Review editor Rob Curley has long been considered one of the newspaper industry’s biggest innovators. Through his times at some of the biggest newspapers in the nation like The Washington Post and Orange County Register to working at small mid-western papers like the Lawrence Journal-World and Topeka Capital-Journal, it’s his love of community journalism that drives him.

After building some of the most award-winning news sites on the Internet, he has been featured on the cover of national magazines and even an Apple commercial. Creativity Magazine named him one of the 50 Most Creative People in the World, and he’s one of the only newspaper editors in the world to give “Tech Talks” to Google’s programmers on the web giant’s main campus in Silicon Valley.

In 2019, Editor & Publisher magazine named The Spokesman-Review as one of the “10 Newspapers That Do It Right” in the United States, focusing on the newspaper’s ground-breaking community events series. With a quick wit and natural knack for whimsical storytelling, Curley is a sought-after speaker on the national and international levels.

Session
Maximizing Effectiveness of Performance Evaluations

Poorly prepared performance evaluations are a “problem lying in wait” and will come back to haunt you and your agency in the future. In this brief program Gordon Graham will lay out what the potential problems are – and what can be done proactively in the performance evaluation process to prevent these problems from occurring. In this program, Gordon will show you how to recognize, prioritize, and mobilize by identifying issues that historically have caused similarly situated agencies problems

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand how poorly prepared performance evaluations can cause major problems in the future.

  • Learn how to build a “performance evaluation process” that works and can help prevent these problems from occurring.

  • Leave the program with an expanded level of knowledge regarding real risk management and how it applies to your specific county operations.

Gordon Graham

Owner

Graham Research
Consultants

Gordon Graham is a retired 33 year veteran of California Law Enforcement. During his tenure as a police professional, he was awarded his Teaching Credential from California State University, Long Beach. He was later graduated from University of Southern California with a Master’s Degree in Safety and Systems Management. Subsequent to this he was graduated from Western State University with a Juris Doctorate. His education as a Risk Manager and experience as a practicing Attorney, coupled with his extensive background in law enforcement, have allowed him to rapidly become recognized as a leading professional speaker with multiple areas of expertise.
Mr. Graham has taken this background as a street cop, supervisor and manager and coupled it with his formal education as a risk manager and his education and experiences as an attorney and is the Co-Founder of Lexipol – a company designed to standardize policies, procedures and training within fire departments and law enforcement agencies around America.

Over the last decade, Mr. Graham has made over 3,000 presentations to various groups including law enforcement, corrections personnel, fraud investigators, fire professionals, EMS, other first responders, legal professionals, educators, city, county and district employees, law firms, hospitals and real estate companies along with many other high-risk private sector organizations.

Session
Engaging with the Legislature – Systems & Tips

The legislative session may be short, but the amount of information that flows through those 60-105 days can be overwhelming. Rather than focusing on how a bill becomes a law, this session walks attendees in detail through the how to use the leg.wa.gov website to obtain valuable information about legislation as well as the information provided by WSAC to its members about WSAC’s priorities and legislative positions. Bill terms and naming conventions will be explained and demystified so that you always know when and where to focus when tracking bills. Learn how to prepare and present testimony and engage in active outreach and lobbying. This interactive session is open to all who wish to attend, including members of WSAC’s Legislative Steering Committee, as well as anyone who wants to expand their insights into the state legislative process. Attendance at Wednesday’s session may be helpful but is not necessary to an understanding of this session.

Learning Outcomes:

  • How to navigate the legislative website & track bills

  • How to decipher bill terms versions

  • How to engage state legislators in meetings and testimony

Mellani McAleenan

Director of Government Relations

WSAC

Ms. Mellani McAleenan joined WSAC as the Director of Government Relations and General Counsel in September 2018.  Mellani has worked in government relations since 2000, most recently as Director of Government Affairs for the Washington State Dental Association. Mellani has also represented the state judicial branch of government as the primary legislative advocate for the Board for Judicial Administration, Administrative Office of the Courts, and Supreme Court.  Prior to her work with the judicial branch, Mellani advocated on behalf of the business community, including six years as a Governmental Affairs Director for the Association of Washington Business.  Mellani earned her Doctor of Jurisprudence degree from Seattle University and her BS in Human Services from Wayland Baptist University.

Session
Engaging with the Legislature – Systems & Tips

The legislative session may be short, but the amount of information that flows through those 60-105 days can be overwhelming. Rather than focusing on how a bill becomes a law, this session walks attendees in detail through the how to use the leg.wa.gov website to obtain valuable information about legislation as well as the information provided by WSAC to its members about WSAC’s priorities and legislative positions. Bill terms and naming conventions will be explained and demystified so that you always know when and where to focus when tracking bills. Learn how to prepare and present testimony and engage in active outreach and lobbying. This interactive session is open to all who wish to attend, including members of WSAC’s Legislative Steering Committee, as well as anyone who wants to expand their insights into the state legislative process. Attendance at Wednesday’s session may be helpful but is not necessary to an understanding of this session.

Learning Outcomes:

  • How to navigate the legislative website & track bills

  • How to decipher bill terms versions

  • How to engage state legislators in meetings and testimony

Mike Hoover

Contract Lobbyist

Mike Hoover Public Affairs

Mike Hoover is an attorney with over 25 years of experience working in state and local governmental affairs. Mike began his career in 1988 working for the California State Assembly and Governor’s office before moving to private practice in Seattle. Mike enjoyed a 20-year legal career in the Washington Legislature, beginning as a staff attorney, serving as Senate Counsel for ten years, and then assuming a Leadership Counsel position in the House of Representatives for six years. Mike next served as Chief Legal Counsel to the King County Council before starting his own public affairs practice in 2018. This experience has provided him with unique expertise and hands-on work in legislative and budget processes.

Working in both state and local government, Mike has been active in almost every policy issue area, including capital and operating budgets, transportation, labor, business, environment, healthcare, education, public infrastructure, finance, and revenue. He has been an integral part of legislation and negotiations for major projects including the McCleary education reforms, Safeco Field financing, complex transportation budgets, and many state operating and capital biennial and supplemental budgets. Mike has secured funding from the state’s various budgets for his clients, and he has successfully shepherded numerous bills through the legislative process and into law.

Mike has the skills, contacts, and experience to support clients in Olympia and throughout Washington. He has worked hard to cultivate excellent bipartisan working relationships with legislators from around the state, in both the House and the Senate, and he also has significant Governor, executive, and agency contacts. He is known as a consensus builder who puts together teams and coalitions to get results.

Mike closely coordinates with his clients to keep them apprised of relevant issues and help them strategize and act to affect those issues. He understands that while the legislative process is the same, each client is different, and each budget and legislative request requires a unique strategy and coalition of legislators. Mike has the ability to partner with other professionals as necessary to ensure the resources and support necessary are always available, and he is adept at matching the right strategy with the right coalition to achieve successful outcomes for his clients. With extensive background in legislative, budgetary, and legal matters, Mike Hoover Public Affairs can provide unparalleled representation.

Session
Re-thinking Homelessness Responses - New Tools and New Rules

Join the Association of County Human Services to hear why now is the time to protect your investments to ensure the needs of your community are being met. This session will highlight actions you can take to promote success and safeguard against unintended consequences where the cost burden will fall on counties.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will gain a thorough understanding of HB1406 and how it can create more housing units

  • Participants will understand how the Martin v. Boise court ruling impacts their community’s response to encampments

  • Participants will be briefed on other legislation and developments that affect housing and homelessness

Kirsten Jewell

Housing and Homelessness Division Manager

Kitsap County Human Services

Kirsten Jewell, EMPA, manages the Housing and Homelessness Division in Kitsap County, including overseeing strategic planning, administering annual community investments of $3M, coordinating countywide efforts, data collection and analysis, and community education. She has worked with homelessness and affordable housing programs in Kitsap County and at the state level for more than 15 years

Kirsten is the Chair of the Governor’s State Advisory Council on Homelessness, and Co-Chairs the ACHS – Homelessness and Affordable Housing Committee. She also serves on the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance – Homeless Advisory Committee.
Kirsten is a life-long resident of Kitsap County. She earned her Executive Master of Public Administration at the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance, UW.

Session
Re-thinking Homelessness Responses - New Tools and New Rules

Join the Association of County Human Services to hear why now is the time to protect your investments to ensure the needs of your community are being met. This session will highlight actions you can take to promote success and safeguard against unintended consequences where the cost burden will fall on counties.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will gain a thorough understanding of HB1406 and how it can create more housing units

  • Participants will understand how the Martin v. Boise court ruling impacts their community’s response to encampments

  • Participants will be briefed on other legislation and developments that affect housing and homelessness

Kalya Schott-Bresler

Deputy County Administrator

Skagit County

Kayla Schott-Bresler is the Deputy County Administrator for Skagit County, where she works on policy and legislative issues on behalf of the Board of County Commissioners. Prior to this role, she oversaw implementation of the County’s affordable housing and homeless services programs and served as Co-Chair of the ACHS Homelessness and Affordable Housing Committee. Kayla earned her Master’s degree in American policy history from the University of Washington.

Session
Re-thinking Homelessness Responses - New Tools and New Rules

Join the Association of County Human Services to hear why now is the time to protect your investments to ensure the needs of your community are being met. This session will highlight actions you can take to promote success and safeguard against unintended consequences where the cost burden will fall on counties.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will gain a thorough understanding of HB1406 and how it can create more housing units

  • Participants will understand how the Martin v. Boise court ruling impacts their community’s response to encampments

  • Participants will be briefed on other legislation and developments that affect housing and homelessness

Michele Thomas

Director of Policy and Advocacy

Washington Low Income Housing Alliance and Housing Alliance Action Fund

Michele is the Director of Policy and Advocacy with the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance and Housing Alliance Action Fund. She joined the staff of the Alliance in 2009 after working for eight years as community organizer with the Tenants Union of Washington State, where she helped tenants to organize for justice in their homes and to win new rights. She believes deeply in the power of organized communities to make change and believes that homelessness will end when the public will demands it.

Session
Federal & Local Government Partnerships to Combat Cyber Threats
More information coming soon!
Session
Health Care Integration - It’s Arrived: Participate Now, or Pay Later?

Come January, the state’s Heath Care Authority will have completed their transition to contracting with Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) to administer behavioral health care to people who are covered by Medicaid in Washington State. Crisis services in some regions of the state will also be privatized. Does this mean that counties can now sit back and let the insurance companies assume the responsibility for the care of our residents? If this new model fails, it will impact the most expensive systems in your counties: EMS and the Criminal Justice System.

Join the Association of County Human Services to hear why now is the time to protect your investments to ensure the needs of your community are being met. This session will highlight actions you can take to promote success and safeguard against unintended consequences where the cost burden will fall on counties.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Increased knowledge of Medicaid behavioral health system transformation.

  • Increased understanding of local impact resulting from state-wide change.

  • Increased awareness of the changes in regional or local oversight in an era without RSNs or BHOs

Julie de Losada

Health Analyst

Skagit County

Julie de Losada is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Child Mental Health Specialist. She began her career path at the age of 15 working in a unique on campus pre-school supported by her high school and local community college. This gave Julie her first insights into the wonder and magic of young children and their ability to be resilient despite significant life challenges. Julie’s early desire to support families and children lead her to the field of family and child counseling, and later into the “behind the scenes” world of regional Medicaid administration where she spent 12 years developing and supporting local systems to provide behavioral health coverage to eligible low-income adults, children, pregnant women, older adults, and people with disabilities.

For the last three years, Julie has paired her extensive knowledge of Medicaid with the foundational public health framework. As a Health Analyst for Skagit County Public Health, Julie addresses issues of equity and social determinants of health through overseeing prevention and developmental disabilities programs, local behavioral health programs, and as liaison between local county government and the regional and state Medicaid systems.

Julie has served on several state taskforces and committees. She currently serves as North Sound Regional Representative for the Washington State Association of Public Health Officers; as Behavioral Health Committee Co-Chair for the Association of County Human Services; and as Program Council Member for the North Sound Accountable Communities of Health.

Session
Health Care Integration - It’s Arrived: Participate Now, or Pay Later?

Come January, the state’s Heath Care Authority will have completed their transition to contracting with Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) to administer behavioral health care to people who are covered by Medicaid in Washington State. Crisis services in some regions of the state will also be privatized. Does this mean that counties can now sit back and let the insurance companies assume the responsibility for the care of our residents? If this new model fails, it will impact the most expensive systems in your counties: EMS and the Criminal Justice System.

Join the Association of County Human Services to hear why now is the time to protect your investments to ensure the needs of your community are being met. This session will highlight actions you can take to promote success and safeguard against unintended consequences where the cost burden will fall on counties.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Increased knowledge of Medicaid behavioral health system transformation.

  • Increased understanding of local impact resulting from state-wide change.

  • Increased awareness of the changes in regional or local oversight in an era without RSNs or BHOs

Anne Deacon

Human Services
Manager

Whatcom County
Health Department

Anne Deacon serves as Whatcom County’s Human Services Manager, working in the Health Department. She is licensed as an Independent Clinical Social Worker and has over 40 years of experience working in the field of behavioral health. Her past roles include managing the state prison for offenders with mental illness, directing out patient and residential clinics for mental health and substance use disorder treatment, and administering human service programs at a state and local level. Anne is the past president of the state Association of County Human Services. Locally, she has led community-wide efforts to address the Opiate addiction epidemic and homelessness, has helped to create behavioral health interventions that divert people from the criminal justice system when appropriate, and developed recovery support systems that promote long-term stability. She also serves as a member of the local Incarceration Prevention and Reduction Task Force/Law & Justice Council.

Session
Census 2020: Are you aware and ready?

The 2020 Census is just around the corner – and getting the count right is important to the fair and accurate distribution of political power and economic resources nationwide and within the state. Washington communities recognize the importance of the Census and are banding together to make sure everyone in the community is educated about the census and motivated to respond. Each community will adopt a different approach, but many communities are embracing the challenge of ensuring a complete count with the goal of building and reinforcing community ties for the long-run. Come hear about new innovations adopted to ensure a complete count at less cost – and learn what communities around the state are doing to prepare! At the end of my session, participants will have a good understanding of the innovative processes that the Census Bureau has introduced that guarantee the 2020 Census won’t be anything like the census that your grandparents remember, know what communities in the state are doing to organize for the 2020 Census, and understand what resources are available within the state and across the nation to support the effort to educate residents about the importance of the census and motivate participation.

Learning Outcomes:

  • How the 2020 Census will be conducted and why it is important

  • What is being done already to educate the WA state residents

  • What counties can do to support this education process and encourage participation

Lisa McLean

2020 Census
Coordinator

Office of Financial
Management

Lisa McLean serves as the coordinator of the statewide 2020 Census outreach effort. Working with nonprofit, philanthropic, and appointed and elected leaders across the state, she spearheads the state’s efforts to educate and build awareness about the 2020 Census—and ultimately encourage confidence, trust, and participation in the process. To this task, Lisa brings 25 years of experience managing nonpartisan grassroots political organizing projects in the Americas, Africa, Middle East, and Europe. She holds a BA in Economics from Boston College and an MA in International Affairs from Johns Hopkins University.

Session
How the Endangered Species Act and National Environmental Policy Act Impact State and Local Governments and Citizens

This session provides an overview of 2 laws designed by Congress to protect and consider the environment. The Endangered Species Act and the National Environmental Policy Act and the most effective ways for state and local governments to have input.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Structure and procedures for species testing and critical habitat designation under the Endangered Species Act

  • Purpose and considerations under the National Environmental Policy Act

  • Ways for local governments to effectively influence federal agency decisions effecting their counties

Karen Budd-Falen

Deputy Solicitor for Parks and Wildlife

Department of the Interior

Karen Budd-Falen was appointed by the Secretary of the Interior (DOI) as the Deputy Solicitor for Parks and Wildlife in November, 2018. Prior to her current appointment, Karen served for three years in the Reagan Administration, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C., as a Special Assistant to the Assistant Secretary for Land and Minerals Management. She later served as a law clerk to the Assistant Solicitor for Water and Power. In between her stints in Washington D.C., she, along with her husband Frank Falen, were the owners of a private law firm located in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Karen has also worked as an attorney at Mountain States Legal Foundation, a public interest legal foundation in Denver, Colorado.

At DOI, Karen works on issues relating to the Endangered Species Act, national wildlife refuges and National parks. While she was in private practice, Karen represented private property owners, ranching and farming organizations, and local governments. Karen has assisted local governments in asserting their rights of consistency review, cooperation and coordination in federal agency decisions; private property owners in protecting their Constitutionally guaranteed property rights, other multiple users in supporting grazing and multiple use on federal/public lands; exposing the amount of fees paid by the taxpayers under the attorney fee shifting statutes.

Some of Karen’s publications include The Right to Graze Livestock on the Federal Lands: The Historical Development of Western Grazing Rights, Idaho Law Review, Spring, 1994; Protecting Community Stability and Local Economies: Opportunities for County Government Influence in Federal Decision and Policy Making Processes, Whitman College, 1996; and Counterpoint: Opportunities Lost and Opportunities Gained: Separating Truth from Myth in the Western Ranching Debate, Karen Budd-Falen editor, Lewis and Clark Law School Environmental Law, 2006.
Karen was featured in Newsweek Magazine’s “Who’s Who: 20 for the Future” for her work on property rights issues (September 30, 1991). Karen was awarded Wyoming’s Outstanding Ag Citizen in 2001; the “Always There Helping” award from the New Mexico Stock Growers Association in 2003; the “Bud’s Contract” award from the New Mexico Public Lands Council in 2006 and the Individual of the Year award from the Arizona/New Mexico Counties for Stable Economic Growth in 2011.

Karen has presented testimony before the U.S. House of Representatives, Subcommittee on Forest Health; the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Resources; the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Resources relating to the National Environmental Policy Act; the U.S. House of Representatives Full Committee on Natural Resources; and the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. Karen has also testified before committees of the Wyoming Legislature.

Karen is an active volunteer and coach for Future Farmers of America (“FFA”). Karen grew up as a fifth generation rancher on a family-owned ranch in Big Piney, Wyoming. She received her undergraduate degrees and her law degree from the University of Wyoming. Karen and Frank have two children, Isaac (wife Reva Falen) and Sarah (husband Hunter Perala) and grandson, Wesley.

Session
What is “Real” Risk Management

Gordon Graham will “drill down” on what “real” risk management is all about and how to proactively address these problems lying in wait – and what the consequences are when these issues are ignored. Gordon will then give the attendees some thoughts on the “ten families of risk” and provide a process for identifying the specific issues (systemic and idiosyncratic) that your county organization faces in each of these families – and how to build viable control measures to address these identified risks.

In this program, Gordon will show you how to recognize, prioritize, and mobilize by identifying issues that historically have caused similarly situated agencies problems.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Learn how to identify the real risks faced in each of these ten families.

  • Learn how to build processes to address these identified risks and help prevent these problems from occurring.

  • Leave the program with an expanded level of knowledge regarding real risk management and how it applies to your specific county operations.

Gordon Graham

Owner

Graham Research Consultants

Gordon Graham is a retired 33 year veteran of California Law Enforcement. During his tenure as a police professional, he was awarded his Teaching Credential from California State University, Long Beach. He was later graduated from University of Southern California with a Master’s Degree in Safety and Systems Management.

Subsequent to this he was graduated from Western State University with a Juris Doctorate. His education as a Risk Manager and experience as a practicing Attorney, coupled with his extensive background in law enforcement, have allowed him to rapidly become recognized as a leading professional speaker with multiple areas of expertise.

Mr. Graham has taken this background as a street cop, supervisor and manager and coupled it with his formal education as a risk manager and his education and experiences as an attorney and is the Co-Founder of Lexipol – a company designed to standardize policies, procedures and training within fire departments and law enforcement agencies around America.

Over the last decade, Mr. Graham has made over 3,000 presentations to various groups including law enforcement, corrections personnel, fraud investigators, fire professionals, EMS, other first responders, legal professionals, educators, city, county and district employees, law firms, hospitals and real estate companies along with many other high-risk private sector organizations.

The 4th Stage

Thursday, November 21
Session
Know your Audience and Capture their Attention

Ever wonder how your favorite social accounts can prompt you to say, “Heck yes!” to their posts? Wonder no more – the practice of writing to your audience produces some of the most engaging content on the internet.

Learning Outcomes:

  • How to hone in on who your most engaging audience members are

  • Content planning for your calendar

  • Understanding your followers by looking at a journey map

Lacey Faught

CEO

Spry Digital Marketing

Lacey Faught is a natural and trained storyteller, and as CEO of Spry, she leads with transparency, compassion, and an eye towards value. She is obsessed with cultivating online communities and generating quality feedback for all of Spry’s clients. Lacey has a degree in Broadcast News and Political Science from WSU and started Spry in 2011.

Adrienne Harvey

Digital Strategist

Spry Digital Marketing

Adrienne Harvey is a seasoned digital strategist, with expertise in content creation, project management, and social media. With experience at organizations large and small, Adrienne knows firsthand how impactful social media can be. Prior to joining Spry in 2018, Adrienne consulted in academia and worked in financial services digital marketing.

Session
Reaching Rural Communities with Social Media

Rural communities have different digital habits than urban communities. Unlike urban environments, rural communities use social media in different ways to communicate.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Ideas on reaching rural audiences

  • Analog + digital partnerships

  • Examples of different applications and websites you can use in your rural community

Lacey Faught

CEO

Spry Digital Marketing

Lacey Faught is a natural and trained storyteller, and as CEO of Spry, she leads with transparency, compassion, and an eye towards value. She is obsessed with cultivating online communities and generating quality feedback for all of Spry’s clients. Lacey has a degree in Broadcast News and Political Science from WSU and started Spry in 2011.

Adrienne Harvey

Digital Strategist

Spry Digital Marketing

Adrienne Harvey is a seasoned digital strategist, with expertise in content creation, project management, and social media. With experience at organizations large and small, Adrienne knows firsthand how impactful social media can be. Prior to joining Spry in 2018, Adrienne consulted in academia and worked in financial services digital marketing.

Session
Overdose Mapping Program / Overdose Mapping: A Tool to Define the Opioid Problem

Although we are all aware and trying to combat the opioid epidemic, that epidemic has many faces to include the new silent killer and emergence of Fentanyl. This presentation will be dually focused, first on introducing a free and easy tool to collect data on overdoses in your communities. HIDTA developed an OD mapping real time tool which tracks basic overdose data along with the specific location of the overdose. This tool provides a bird’s eye view of how the opioid epidemic is impacting your community and where. The second focus will be to discuss the new and emerging silent killer illicit Fentanyl and its impact on this epidemic.

Learning Outcomes:

  • What is OD Mapping and who is using it now

  • Defining the new threat of Fentanyl here

  • How to get access to and use OD Mapping

Dustin Baunsgard

Criminal Intelligence
Specialist

Spokane DEA Task Force

Dustin Baunsgard is a Criminal Intelligence Specialist with the Northwest High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (NW HIDTA) and is assigned to the Spokane DEA Task Force. A 20 year veteran of law enforcement, Dustin came from an information technology background, which has resulted in a unique application of technology to drug related investigations. As a member of the US Attorney’s Office Opioid Overdose Working Group since its inception, Dustin has championed the adoption of ODMap by multiple law enforcement agencies throughout the Eastern District of Washington. Dustin is qualified as an expert witness in both state and federal court with areas of expertise to include mobile device forensics, cell site analysis, and telephone toll analysis and holds the following professional certifications: CelleBrite Certified Operator, CelleBrite Certified Physical Analyst, Certified Vehicle System Forensic Examiner, Certified Vehicle System Forensic Technician, and certified Video Evidence Recovery Analyst. Dustin has twice been recognized with the National HIDTA Program’s Outstanding Intelligence Analyst of the Year award.

Caitlin Baunsgard

Project Safe
Neighborhoods
Coordinator

Eastern District

Caitlin Baunsgard has been a part of law enforcement since graduating from the University of Washington in 2004. Ms. Baunsgard began her work with law enforcement as a criminal intelligence specialist with the Northwest High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area and the Washington State Patrol. Ms. Baunsgard began her career as a prosecutor during her tenure at Gonzaga University School of Law, and continued after graduation in 2009 as a Special Deputy Prosecuting Attorney for Spokane County. Ms. Baunsgard was hired as an Assistant United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Washington in 2012, wherein she maintains an emphasis in the prosecution of high-level transnational drug trafficking organizations. She is currently the Project Safe Neighborhoods Coordinator for the Eastern District responsible for the successful implementation of evidence-based strategies to reduce violent crime in our communities.

Stephanie Van Marter

Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Coordinator

EDWA

Stephanie Van Marter has been a part of law enforcement since the age of 18 when she began to work for the Spokane Police Department. While working both part time and full time at SPD in juvenile programs and crime analysis for over 5 years, Ms. Van Marter graduated from Gonzaga Law School and began her career as a prosecutor with the Ada County Prosecutors Office in Boise ID. Ms. Van Marter was hired as an Assistant United States Attorney in the EDWA in 2002 and has been there now for 17 years. While an AUSA, Ms. Van Marter has prosecuted and tried a wide variety of criminal offenses to include the possession and use of Biological Weapons (United States v. Kenneth Olsen and United States v. Ryan Buquet); Espionage; the manufacture, possession, receipt and distribution of child pornography; child sexual and physical abuse, violent offenses to include murder, involuntary manslaughter and threats to various federal officials; CITES treaty violations; various firearms cases and a number of multi-defendant Title III drug trafficking prosecutions to include OD related Deaths and Murder in connection with Drug Trafficking Offenses. AUSA Van Marter also has a number of collateral duties and assignments to include the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Coordinator (OCDETF) for the EDWA which she has held for the last 7 years and is also the Senior Litigation Counsel (SLC) for office who is responsible for assisting with training both AUSA’s and law enforcement as to pertinent issues. In her off time, Ms. Van Marter is also a member of the National Ski Patrol.

Session
Ideas for Running Social Media with a Staff of One

Have one day for social media per month? Ever wish you could clone yourself to take on all the tasks of communication? We understand you wear many hats – and we have a plan of attack for you.

Learning Outcomes:

  • A yearlong plan that you can use going forward to schedule your time

  • Weekly and monthly content goals you can delegate out

  • Ideas on how to make the most out of the content you already have

Lacey Faught

CEO

Spry Digital Marketing

Lacey Faught is a natural and trained storyteller, and as CEO of Spry, she leads with transparency, compassion, and an eye towards value. She is obsessed with cultivating online communities and generating quality feedback for all of Spry’s clients. Lacey has a degree in Broadcast News and Political Science from WSU and started Spry in 2011.

Adrienne Harvey

Digital Strategist

Spry Digital Marketing

Adrienne Harvey is a seasoned digital strategist, with expertise in content creation, project management, and social media. With experience at organizations large and small, Adrienne knows firsthand how impactful social media can be. Prior to joining Spry in 2018, Adrienne consulted in academia and worked in financial services digital marketing.

2019 Exhibitors & Sponsors

Washington counties are engaged in delivering a broad range of services, from public health and safety to road construction, environmental mitigation, and social services. With over 35,000 employees serving over 7.5 million residents, counties are looking to private and nonprofit sectors for innovation and solutions to improve their performance.

Join over 350 decision-makers at the County Leaders Conference and showcase your product or service and build new partnerships with the public sector.

FAQS

What is the last day I can register?

While we don’t like to encourage procrastination, we understand you have a busy schedule that is always changing. The last day to secure overnight accommodations is Monday, October 28. However, you may register online until Friday, November 8 if you do not require a sleeping room.

What does it cost to attend?

Full conference registration for WSAC members, partners and affiliates is $425. We do not offer a daily registration rate. Please contact us at info@wsac.org if you have any further questions.

First-time attendees of the County Leaders Conference are eligible for a discounted rate. To take advantage of this reduced registration fee, enter the code FirstCLC before you check out.

State Agencies should register as “State Agency” to be eligible for a discounted rate of $475. Otherwise, businesses that are not members of our Business Partners Program may register as “Non-Member/ Non-State Agency” at the rate of $800.

Are overnight accommodations available?

They sure are, and at a reasonable rate, we might add! Our conference host, The Davenport Grand Hotel, is offering attendees of the County Leaders Conference room rates at $119 a night for single/double occupancy and this includes self-parking.

If you are not staying at The Davenport Grand Hotel, there is a discounted daily self-parking rate of $7.

How do I reserve a room?

You’ll need to reserve overnight accommodations by Monday, October 28, 2019.

We’ve made this easy for you, so we suggest making your reservations now by clicking here and making an online reservation.

Prefer the more traditional way of reserving your room? We’ve got you covered! You can pick up the phone and dial 1-800-918-9344 to make your reservation. Reference the “County Leaders Conference” to secure our group room rate of $119 a night.

Contact

Looking for more information on this conference? Send us an email at info@wsac.org or call 360.753.1886.